The weight of a father-figure is incredibly important. I spent time with a friend early this week who’s got tremendous support from her father. We’ve faced similar challenges, being minorities in entrepreunership (her being in the financing/VC world a women and minority). But the way she approached challenges and her confidence was stark and reminded me of other friends that have strong fathers.

I spent time with a friend early this week who’s got tremendous support from her father. We’ve faced similar challenges, being minorities in entrepreunership (her being in the financing/VC world a women and minority). But the way she approached challenges and her confidence was stark and reminded me of other friends that have strong fathers. When I asked her how she handled feeling overwhelmed, as I have this week, she said her pops was the man that kept her straight.

When I asked her how she handled feeling overwhelmed, as I have this week, she said her pops was what kept her straight. “He’s my adviser”

I hope that one day I’m lucky enough to be a father and I’m excited about stepping into those shoes with a partner that’s equally eager. I’ve written on this before: there is a difference in the friends of mine that have strong men in their life that they’ve looked to. Beyond facades, a recognizable difference most definitely exists.

I’ve got a special appreciation for the dads and father-figures that I come across. You don’t have to be a father to be a father-figure (or mentor). Vijay Uncle, Alexander Uncle and Joy Uncle have been three of my big father figures. I gained a lot from them: special attention for your woman but also special care for all the women around you, extraordinary chivalary and a serious machismo.

These are all Indian men. They are all great. I’m not sure where the stereotypes came to be (well..maybe my dad), but I love that they smash, crash and burn it.

Happy belated International Womens Day, friends.

PS I read something great today in Philanthropy Times, “It’s not men supporting women in equal rights. It’a about a community supporting eachother.” When we throw tags on these things it’s really easy to divorce us from eachother. We are all more similar than different, but that doesn’t mean we forget the differences. We uplift, engage and ensure the differences are not negative. Equality is key to prosperity for our families, communities and world. Together.

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