The paralysis of uncertainty is unmatched. Overcoming it seems to be even more challenging.

Uncertainty has a way of freezing you up and making simple tasks difficult. Uncertainty doesn’t always seem to be a response, but it seems to more often be a precursor to events. When you sense events *intuition kicks.* Your senses kick and without the knowledge or visibility to contextualize it—there’s a situation of brewing uncertainty.

It’s like when you’re in a boat that has a bit of a rock. You look at the sky, some dark clouds are up there. Maybe you heard some thunder. You worry that the boat will flip, but the waters been pretty consistent thus far, it’s just some elements that seem to fit into a pattern–and in your mind this pattern ends with a flipped boat.

Uncertainty can come from anywhere.

At work there are plenty of opportunities for uncertainty.

Companies are hives for uncertainty. This is especially true in an organization where leadership is shifting. It can feel like the ground under you is moving as fast as they are leaving. Maybe you’re at a management consulting firm and there are many more management consultants that management consulting projects. Maybe a new global CEO just came into the picture. At first you were filled with curiosity and a bit of excitement. Now, you’re just looking at your environment and crunching the numbers in your head…the numbers don’t add up. Reconciling the balance sheet needs huge layoffs. Corporate leadership hasn’t provided any insight, you’re operating in the dark and your friends in human resources who are normally loud and cheery seem to be more kept to themselves, whispering in whatever offices are open. Is anyone getting cut, who’s getting cut, are you in a secure situation? A la uncertainty. Simon Sinek talks about improving productivity by increasing certainty by making people in your organization feel secure.

Relationships are a moshpit of uncertainty. Particularly when there’s distance involved, but this can be in any situation. Maybe a few chance encounters with a stranger led to curiosity and phonecalls. At some point you see how incredibly sophisticated yet simple this person is. You’re excited about learning more, but she moves away. You’re wondering when the next time you’ll see her is–uncertain what city she moves to next or what city you end up in. Considering how this situation plays out. Uncertainty.

Let’s not leave out the uncertainty when you text someone and don’t get a response. *facepalm*MemetextherUncertainty is certain in life. The stoic’s have a way of dealing with it:

  1. Amor Fati- Love Everything. Even the bad experiences, especially the uncertainty. This is all apart of the soup of life. That soup would not be perfect without every last ingredient playing a role.
  2. Deo Volente- God Willing. You can do everything in your power, but outcomes are not up to you. They are up to the situation and the universe. Recognize when you give up control to the universe. Be OK with outcomes.
  • Applicability
    • Amor Fati- The experience to express your thoughts and ideas to someone is valuable and exciting. Live in the moment. Experience happiness, adventure and love unlimited and untethered from the stereotypes of your experiences.
    • Deo Volente- Life will unfold as it does. Jobs will be gained, jobs will be lost. Take it as it comes.

Uncertainty is shitty. No question about it. Maybe catch a good night’s sleep and work on being better prepared to deal with lifes situations, as they are often fraught with uncertainty. You can’t control what comes to you, but you are able to chose your response: response ability.

We can’t control outcomes. Uncertainty is certain.

=)

Advertisements

What do you think? Leave your thoughts

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s